Hasard cheratte (Belgium)

The first shaft of this coalmine was dug in 1850. After an accident in 1877, the mine closed for the first time.

It was reopened thirty years later, in 1907, to remain in operation until 1977.

After the closure, the coal laundry and shaft 2 of the mine were demolished in 1980.

However, after these demolition works, people wondered whether anything should be kept. Shaft 1 was then designated as a monument and the remnants of the mine came into the hands of another owner, who wanted to keep the mine as complete as possible.

However, it died in 2012, after which the mine again came into the hands of the municipality. In the beginning of the 21st century, the ruins of the mine buildings remained.

Remediation of the site and the demolition of a number of buildings started in February 2017 by order of the municipality.

Only shaft 1 with all buildings connected with it, and the bridge over the road, are spared and will be restored.

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Mine B (Belgium)

In 1906 a concession was granted for the extraction of coal, for which a societe anonyme was founded in 1907.

The construction of the mine shafts started, and in 1908, the coal mine was opened.

The miners lived in housing complexes that were erected and so a factory settlement (cité) was created.

In order to attract people, relatively good facilities were provided to make sure that the entire settlement was virtually self-sufficient.

However, the residents were completely dependent on the mine, and if they lost their jobs – they had to move.

176 miners lost their lives while working there throughout the years.

In 1989 the mine got closed and many people lost their jobs: it was a disaster for the wide area back then.

The enormous buildings and the terrils have been preserved and are partly used as museum.

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